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How to Adapt Buttoning and Zipping For Your Child

<Buttoning and Zipping can be stressful and difficult to learn.  Check out these OT tricks to adapt buttons and zippers for your kid!>

 

Busy parents on the go have their plate full in the morning. Breakfast, washing up, brushing teeth, and finding backpacks all help create that chaotic school day morning.

Then don’t forget about getting dressed! 

When little ones can get dressed on their own, it takes a huge burden off moms and dads in the morning.  Buttons and zippers can be a major inconvenience.

BUT- there are some simple ways to adapt buttoning and zipping so that your child can do it independently.

Many toddlers and young school age children wear sweats and leggings to school to avoid the work of buttoning and zipping.

What about older children with weak fine motor skills?

What about children with physical limitations?

They should be able to wear jeans and other clothing just like their peers!    Here’s how.

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EZPZ for therapists

How to stop the disastrous mealtime spills!

<Finding a new product that I can use with students to improve their time on task AND  limit messes is no easy feat.  In fact, it’s a bit of a miracle. EZPZ>

I am so excited that I have become an affiliate for this amazing company – EZPZ!  So I’m able to give you a link to get an extra 10% off any EZPZ that you  purchase! (See below for links and discounts)

I have a lot of students on my OT caseload who are clumsy, uncoordinated, and distracted.

Then, there are the students who are impulsive, avoidant, and behavioral.

This leads to TONS of spilled paint, knocked over blocks, and (the worst) tiny items that end up ALL OVER my classroom floor.

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How to Motivate Your Child With ASD – 5 OT secrets

Autism Spectrum Disorder

5 Ways to Understand what Motivates a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Today we have a guest post from Occupational Therapist Hope Caracci.  Hope specializes in the evaluation and treatment of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Sensory Processing Dysfunction.  She is a well-known speaker who often presents on the topic of Autism Spectrum Disorder. (See below for more information on her next conference in November).

 


Are you having difficulty motivating your clients or your child to participate in learning activities?

Learning a new skill requires the internal drive to do so.  Unfortunately, children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) often lack intrinsic motivation.

As an experienced OT who has presented and written extensively about Autism Spectrum Disorder, I have some secrets to share!

These are my 5 tried and true techniques to identify what is interesting and meaningful to a child with ASD.  

They really work, and can help you to improve the child’s participation significantly!

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Best Baby Shower Gift Ever And It’s Not On The Registry

<Baby shower gifts can be so dull and boring.  Finally, a different personal  baby shower gift that the new mom definitely didn’t register for…>


I have a confession:  I hate baby showers.

And bridal showers too.

I know it makes me a horrible  person.  And I am TRULY happy for my friend and their new milestone.  I just hate having to sit somewhere for four hours drinking punch with no liquor in it when I could be reading a book, going to yoga or cleaning out my closet.

I’m a terrible person.  I know.

BUT – I suck it up and do my womanly duty because it’s the right thing to do and I know my friend needs the loot.

Plus, I LOVE to give presents.  I always give my BEST EVER “Miss Jaime OT” baby shower gift. I’ve perfected it over the years and every one of my friends has gushed about how useful it was.   Plus, NO ONE thinks to register for it.

 I can’t wait to share it with you!

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Every new mom registers for diapers, bottles, and  sheets, etc.  They go up and down the aisles aiming their “gift gun” at all kinds of silly things that they may never end up using; noise machines, diaper genies, and special “baby” detergent.

BUT THEY ALWAYS FORGET THIS ESSENTIAL ITEM.

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Your Child With Special Needs: How to Conquer Independent Bathing

child with special needs

Teach your child with special needs to shower independently with these 20+ tips from a pediatric OT. It will improve their quality of life as well as yours.

 

Your child with a Special Needs: How to conquer independent Bathing

<20 plus Occupational Therapy tips and strategies to facilitate independent showering and bathing for your child with special needs>


“I have no time to myself.  Ever.  My other kids were at least taking a bath by themselves by the time they were 7, but I can’t leave him alone….”

The young mom had bags under her eyes and a stain on her T-shirt.  The corners of her mouth turned down in a helpless, sad expression as she looked at her sweet ten-year-old child with Down’s Syndrome who was playing quietly with the toys in the waiting room.

She was exhausted.

Raising a child with special needs can do that to you.

I spent 5 years working as an Occupational Therapist in a residential home for adults with Developmental Disabilities.  Plus, working with dozens of families who have a child with special needs has taught me a few AMAZING tricks.

And I’m happy to share every one of them.

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SNAPTYPE PRO

The App That Will Make You a Hero To Your Dysgraphic Students

<Students who struggle with getting their thoughts on paper and HATE writing  will LOVE this game-changing app called SnapType Pro.>


With two weeks left of school, the middle school was HOT and sticky.  The smell of sweaty teenagers who just didn’t want to be in school permeated through the hallways.  As I sat across from the teenager who “HATES writing”, I could see his face growing red.

The tears were building up.

And he still had one more essay to finish.

Having to concentrate on a final exam is just torture for anyone, but it’s even worse for a child with a disability.   

Thank goodness I found a way to help this poor child. 

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Does this sound familiar? 

If you know someone who is dysgraphic, you’re familiar with the symptoms.

  • Messy handwriting
  • Difficulty putting thoughts down on paper
  • Physically slow when writing
  • Difficulty with spelling
  • Organizing words and sentences is a challenge

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