Sensory Theraplay Box

Do you know a child who just LOVES Sensory toys?  I mean gooey, flashy, squishy, squeezable and spinnable toys that stimulate their senses of sight, taste, touch, smell, and hearing.

As a pediatric Occupational Therapist, I have to admit that I have a LOT of students who love sensory stimulation.  And I have a bunch of sensory toys that I use routinely in my therapy sessions.

But it’s very easy to get stuck in a rut. 

My kids get bored with the same toys over and over.  But I don’t have time to go scouring for new sensory toys all the time.  And the families that I work with aren’t sure what to get or where to get the perfect sensory toys for their children.

But there’s a solution!

Sensory toys, SPD, sensory processing,

I recently discovered Sensory Theraplay Box, a subscription sensory play box that’s delivered to your doorstep!  This is such a cool idea – a box full of new sensory toys specially hand picked by a pediatric Occupational Therapist delivered to your house during the first week of the month.

Each box is different! It’s filled with toys to help develop important sensory-motor skills & stimulate the senses.  These are perfect for getting your child to engage in sensory play!

Here are the details:

  • A variety of toys to engage your child in fun, silly sensory play!
  • Boxes ship out the first week of each month
  • Items are therapeutic & can be calming or help manage anxiety
  • Curated for children with autism/ sensory needs in mind, but suitable for children of all abilities
  • Each month’s box is carefully assembled by a licensed occupational therapist and includes a description card inside

You know when you are looking for the perfect gift and you just don’t know what to get?

It’s the worst.

This is the perfect gift for a child with Sensory Processing difficulties.  Or a child who thrives on engaging sensory play.  Actually, it’s the perfect gift for any child!

The Sensory Theraplay is a wonderful gift idea for birthdays, holidays, or other special occasions.   It’s an amazing way to get a child actively playing with sensory toys, using their imagination,  and learning how to self-regulate.

THE PERFECT GIFT FOR A CHILD WITH Sensory Needs, AUTISM OR ADHD

The Sensory Theraplay Box is filled with engaging, appropriate toys that encouraged children to functionally play and use their hands.   The boxes are designed for children who have sensory needs, but they are fun for any child!

I have to say, I am impressed with the quality and range of toys that were included in my box.   I brought them to school and my kids were psyched!

“Where did you get this?”

“Can I keep this?”   

The variety of toys included in my box appealed to all of my students.  Those who needed alerting activities were excited with the stimulating toys, and those who played with the calming activities showed improved self-regulation.

CHECK OUt Some Sensory Theraplay Boxes:

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Understanding Your Child’s Annual Review Test Scores

Annual review time can be stressful for parents and teachers.

Unfortunately, sometimes the child simply doesn’t qualify for what a parent is asking for.  It’s very important to understand your child’s test scores and to know the special education process.

Understanding Your Child’s Standardized Test Scores

The district will only provide special education services to a child who is significantly behind his peers. A child who is “Below Average” is NOT significantly delayed.

Parents are often unhappy with “Below Average” or “Low Average”, but those terms are still within the Average range.

First, a child meets eligibility criteria to be classified as a child who needs specialized instruction in order to access their curriculum. Then, the Committee on Special Education or the Committee on Preschool Special Education will classify that child into one of 13 different categories.  They will develop an IEP  (Individualized Education Program).

The classification DOES NOT determine the level of services a child will receive. For example, a classification of Autism does not automatically mean the child will receive more services.

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rush hour

The Therapeutic Benefits of “Rush-Hour” Game

The Therapeutic benefits of RUSH HOUR Game for OTs, SLps, and Educators

Don’t you just love when you find a toy that works on a ton of different skills?  As a pediatric OT, these kinds of toys are my absolute favorite!

One of my very favorite OT therapy toys is called the Rush Hour game.  It’s small so it fits right in my therapy bag.

Plus, it works on so many different skills!

  • Visual Perceptual Skills
  • Spatial Orientation
  • Left-Right Directionality
  • Direction Following
  • Sequencing
  • Problem Solving
  • Fine Motor Skills

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Effortless art crayons

Effortless Art Crayons

“Effortless Art Crayons”  is a sponsored post

“Every time he wants to change colors, I have to waste two minutes adapting the crayon.  It’s such a waste of time!”

Occupational therapists and special education teachers are magicians when it comes to adapting stuff for our kids with weak motor skills, developmental delays, or atypical grasp patterns.  But sometimes it’s just a pain in the neck!

The main goal is to help children be independent.  So if an adult has to step in every few minutes to put the grip on a new crayon or adjust a child’s fingers so they are in a functional position, it goes against what we are working toward (Independence!)

It’s easy to keep a grip on a pencil, but what about crayons?  The child wants to change colors every few minutes- that’s half the fun!

I’ve found the solution. 

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core strength, sensory, hyperactivity

The real reason your students can’t sit still…Poor Core Strength!

Poor core strength is often the reason kids can’t sit still…

“Do you mind taking a look at one of my students?  He just can’t seem to stay in his chair…”

As a school based Occupational Therapist, I hear this question at least twice a week.

For the most part, kids are expected to sit at their desks in the classroom. There are times when the class breaks up into groups and move around to sit on the floor, etc., but for the rest of the day, they are supposed to sit in their seat.

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Handwriting 101: The Handwriting Basics You Need to Know!

Handwriting, graphomotor skills, spacing tricks,

HANDWRITING 101: UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS

Handwriting is a complicated motor skill that requires dexterity, strength, motor planning skills, and visual memory. In the past, children learned the alphabet and how to write their letters in kindergarten. These days, children are learning how to write earlier and earlier.

Most preschools boast that they include capital and lowercase letters in their daily instruction, even though the NY state curriculum expects capitals and a few lowercase.

Why? Parents want their children to be prepared for kindergarten. Nowadays, most children are already writing on the first day of school. However, their muscles aren’t ready to start so young.

What should we do?

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Holiday Themed Visual Perceptual Activity Packet

FREEBIE: 5 PAGE HOLIDAY THEMED VISUAL PERCEPTUAL ACTIVITY PACKET

holiday themed visual perceptual activity packet

FREE FOR SUBSCRIBERS!

Don’t you just love the holidays?

I do.  Especially at school with the kids.  There are so many fun things going on: concerts, holiday boutique, holiday parties, Secret Santas, and all kinds of jolliness.

Sometimes it can be hard to keep those kids engaged, though.  They are overstimulated from all the music, busy decorations,  sweet treatments and holiday excitement.

At times like this, I love to have some fun activities or worksheets to do with the kids on my OT caseload. This year, I’m focusing on visual perceptual skills.

I’ve created a Holiday Themed Visual-Perceptual Activities packet that I can use with all of my kids – from my Kindergarteners to my Middle Schoolers.  Some of the activities are very simple, while others are pretty tough.

All of the pages are black and white – because coloring is great fine motor work! To work on shoulder stability, have the kids do these worksheets on a vertical surface or while laying on their tummy!

My Free Holiday Themed Visual Perceptual Activities packet works on the following skills:

Visual Discrimination: This is the ability to notice and compare the features of an item to match or distinguish it from another item; distinguishing a P from an R, matching shapes to complete a puzzle, etc.

Visual Figure Ground: This is the ability to find something in a busy background; finding the red crayon in a messy supply box, or finding the milk in a packed fridge, as well as finding a bit of specific text on a busy printed page.

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