6 Ways to Use Wootape at home & in the classroom

 

What is WooTape?

WooTape is the therapeutic handwriting tape that allows parents, teachers, and therapists to accommodate any worksheet or activity in the moment!  Simply peel, tear, and apply the tape to any paper or surface. It comes in three different sizes, so you can accommodate for each child as necessary.

This is so great for students who struggle with spatial awareness and letter size.

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6 Ways to Use WooTape in the classroom or home

1) Support an early writer’s ability to properly size and place their name consistently

The name line may (or may not exist) on every worksheet a child receives. Regardless, the need to write their name on it will always be required.  Children need to write their name on everything.  After a while, they can scribble it down with their eyes closed. But without enough proper instruction and repetition, the monotony of it can become quick, meaningless, and often the most illegible writing on their paper.

When parents or teachers take the time to add the proper visual boundaries for children’s names on every paper (especially for early writers PK-1st grade), students get in the habit of proportioning the letters correctly. Instead, children sometimes aren’t provided any visual boundaries. This leaves them to guess how tall or wide to make them and helpless when required to spatially organize them.

To better support children, simply add WooTape to the name line to provide a topline and midline before copying worksheets.

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2) Use WOOTAPE TO Adapt charts to improve sizing and spatial organization

There are countless academic tasks with worksheets that leaving large open boxes/spaces to write in. Compare and contrast activities and graphic organizers are the worst culprits. Many times, the teacher requests that students provide a minimum of 3 examples.  When children don’t have visual cues telling them how big to make their letters, they often struggle to make them fit.

Place WooTape on the chart and the child has clear expectations of where their ideas can be written.

3) Label pictures, crafts, or science activities neatly

WooTape is excellent for placing directly on children’s art projects.  They can identify people in their pictures, give a title to their art piece, or label the parts of an insect or flower. These are tasks they are usually expected to do without proper visual supports.  This can end up ruining the finished product because they end up writing all over the page.

Instead, provide them a small piece of WooTape where it is needed, so the child can keep the overall creation clean, organized, and legible.

4) Use WOOTAPE to support grasp development and wrist alignment by using on a vertical surface

WooTape is fantastic for placing on any flat surface. Because there is a slight tackiness on the back, it is easily removable from most surfaces without damage making it the perfect handwriting intervention to place on walls, mirrors, windows, and doors or even under tables!

Working on a vertical surface is great for working on upper extremity strength, wrist stability, and pencil grasp.

Most walls have some sort of texture, so using WooTape on these surfaces provides lots of opportunities for tactile feedback.

(Disclaimer: when allowing your child to write on walls with WooTape, use a tool such as a pencil where it is easier to erased or wiped off)

5) Use it as a visual guide to improving cutting accuracy

Place any size WooTape on paper (preferably a thick cardstock or index card) and encourage the child to cut on the dashed line. If the child stays within the bolded sidelines, it is easy to track progress toward their cutting goal.

6) Wootape encourages fine motor skills and independence

Using tape has a lot of therapeutic benefits—fine motor skills to peel up the edge, bilateral coordination, and grading of force to unroll some but not too much tape.  It also takes and strength and coordination to tear a piece off.

Many students are able to master these skills independently by the 2nd grade. This allows them to accommodate their own work without assistance from an adult. Now the teacher can support other students in the class, and the child’s success and confidence are boosted by adding some quick and straightforward visual boundaries to consistently produce legible work.

For the rest of the month of April, you can get a 20% discount on Wootape with the promo code  OTMONTH.

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Ten Best Apps for Handwriting with Kids

As I walked into school the other day, a friend of mine grabbed me in a panic and said “Should my four-year-old really be practicing a page of letters every night?! This is the only time I get to spend with her and I’m forcing her to write a whole page of D’s! This stinks!”

No, as an OT, I don’t believe that a four-year-old should be practicing a page of letters for twenty minutes a night.  It’s too much for those little hands.

But – an educator who spends two days a week in kindergarten, I have to say, this is where the curriculum is going. Developmentally, preschoolers are still preschoolers, but kindergarten curriculum expectations have increased tremendously.  Little kids are expected to be able to write upon entering kindergarten.  Preschools are bowing to the pressure and teaching what used to be the kindergarten curriculum.

I felt empathetic towards my friend who just wants to play with her little girl at night, rather than drilling her to finish a worksheet.  But here’s what I told her.

Think about it differently.  You have the chance to make sure she learns all her letters correctly before she starts Kindergarten.  There will be other children in her class who don’t know their letters, and the teacher won’t be able to really sit with them one on one to make sure they get it.  Many teachers teach one letter a day in two forms (capital and uppercase), so the kids don’t really develop the motor memory.  It’s difficult for kids to learn it and to write comfortably at this rushed pace.   If a child learns their letters correctly it is so much easier for them to write neatly.  It becomes automatic.”

 

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