Toileting and Sensory Processing

toileting, potty training, pooping, teaching to poop, poop in potty, poop and sensory issues

Potty-training can be a challenge for parents, but it’s also an important part childhood development. The normal struggle can be even more difficult when there are sensory processing issues. Recognizing that they need to go, wearing big girl or big boy underwear, and being able to use different toilets can all be impacted by sensory processing.

Why does Sensory processing matter?

Toileting requires a significant amount of body awareness.  Children have to understand how their body is feeling, learn how to release their bowel and bladder muscles in order to go, and feel that they have “finished” and their bowel or bladder is now empty.  

Sensory processing is a natural part of the toileting process. 

A bathroom environment can be overstimulating to start with.   We receive sensory information from our eyes, ears, skin, muscles, and joints and our brain’s job is to organize the information, select the important parts, and disregard the rest. When a child’s sensory systems are functioning appropriately,  they are able to participate in activities of daily living such as potty-training.  However, if the sensory systems are not integrated properly, toileting can become problematic.  

Everything parents Need to know

  1. WHAT IS SENSORY PROCESSING?
  2. HOW SENSORY SYSTEMS RELATE TO TOILETING
  3. BODY AWARENESS NEEDED FOR TOILET TRAINING
  4. PROBLEMS
    1. POOR INTEROCEPTION
    2. SENSORY DEFENSIVENESS
    3. POOR REGISTRATION OF SENSORY INPUT
    4. SENSORY SEEKING
    5. SENSORY AVOIDING
  5. HOW TO HELP: 15 AMAZING STRATEGIES FOR TOILETING
  6. CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

what is Sensory Processing?

Sensory Processing refers to how the nervous system detects, regulates, interprets and responds to sensory information.  Sensory Processing is an important factor in considering a child’s attention, memory, behavior, and function (Ahn, Miller, Milberger, & McIntosh, 2004; Gardner &Johnson, 2013).   A child’s brain needs to be able to register sensory information from the environment and react appropriately to it.  If a child has difficulty regulating and processing sensory information, they may have Sensory Processing Disorder.

Sensory Processing Disorder is a neurological disorder in which the sensory information that a child perceives results in abnormal responses.   Children who have difficulty processing sensory information often have inconsistent responses because they have a hard time discriminating between which sensory information is important and which can be ignored.  

It is important to note that many children (and adults for that matter) have difficulty with processing certain types of sensory input.  Typical things such as disliking certain smells or textures, feeling seasick on rides, or preferring certain foods do not necessarily mean that a child has sensory processing disorder. They may simply still be learning to process certain sensory stimuli.

toilet training, potty training, toileting readiness, developmental checklists

There are eight  sensory systems in our bodies:

  1. Tactile System (touch)
  2. Vestibular System (balance)
  3. Proprioceptive System (position in space)
  4. Olfactory System (smell)
  5. Visual System (sight)
  6. Auditory System (hearing)
  7. Gustatory System (taste)
  8. Interoceptive System (internal body awareness)

Interoception is our ability to sense what is going on inside our bodies internally.  It includes sensations such as thirst, hunger, fatigue, pain, breath, itchiness, nausea, temperature, etc.  It also includes our sense of if we have a full bladder or bowel, and if we have “released” it. (Garland, 2014).

An Explanation of the Sensory Systems related to Toileting

The proprioceptive, vestibular, and touch senses are primary influences on the integration of our senses.  The interoceptive sense also plays a crucial role in developing the foundational body awareness needed to function as a child.

When a child is unable to integrate and react to sensory information appropriately, the child will not interact with his environment in a functional manner.  He may have exaggerated responses to typical noises or sensations or withdraw from certain stimuli. The child cannot consistently process sensory information, so their responses will be inconsistent, too.

If the child has decreased body awareness, they may demonstrate an inefficient grading of force or movement.  For a boy, this may mean they have difficulty using the right amount of force when holding or aiming the penis.  This might result in a child pressing so hard that it’s difficult to pee,  holding too tightly, or having difficulty holding steady.

Our vestibular system helps us to maintain our balance. The fluid in our inner ear moves as our head moves, sending messages to our brain about where our body is in space (Abraham, 2002).   Some children with vestibular dysfunction present with “gravitational insecurity“, which makes them seek a secure position during activities. They may dislike swings, being picked up, or participating in activities in which they are not in control of their body in space.  These children might be fearful when attempting to sit on a “grown-up” toilet where their bottom is unsupported because they feel like they may fall.

Children with vestibular, tactile, and proprioception difficulties may have difficulty with eye-hand coordination and depth perception. It may be difficult for them to aim appropriately or estimate where to stand.

Many children with sensory processing difficulties have auditory sensitivities that interfere with toilet training.  Think of the loud echoes, flushing toilet, the hand dryers, etc.  Noises that are simply loud to an adult can be piercing to a child with auditory sensitivities.

Tactile sensitivities can interfere with toileting, too! Children may dislike the sensation of pooping, wiping, or even sitting on a hard seat.   If they are under-responsive to touch, they may not realize that they aren’t covering their hand properly with the toilet paper, they aren’t wiping well enough to clean themselves, or that they’ve soiled their clothing.

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Sensory Processing and Body Awareness needed for Toilet Training

When our body is able to receive and interpret the signals from our skin, muscles, and joints, we are able to feel and know what our body is doing without looking at it.  When a child has poor body awareness, it can lead to difficulty coordinating their body to do all of the components that are involved in toileting.   It is not automatic to feel the urge to go and just go to the bathroom.  Each step of the task must be thought out and carefully performed, so it is important to be patient.  It’s hard to know what to do if you can’t feel what you are supposed to feel!

Typically, toddlers and preschoolers spend a lot of time learning the “ins and outs” of toileting.   Children are expected to be toileting independently before entering Kindergarten.  Children with difficulties modulating sensory input find potty training to be a much bigger challenge than a typical child.  The bathroom can be an overstimulating environment, so asking a child with sensory integration difficulties to focus on the task at hand (ie; peeing or pooping) is a challenge if they are overwhelmed with fear or anxiety about other sensory signals they are receiving.  Problems with toileting and sensory processing might include (but not be limited to) the following:

Toileting and Sensory Processing Problems

1. Toileting and Sensory Processing Related to Poor Interoception

  • May be unaware that his bowel or bladder is full.
  • Feels that they need to go, but not be able to discriminate whether they need to urinate OR have a bowel movement.
  • Unable to “push” in order to go; don’t understand how to make those muscles work
  • Cannot feel that they have had an accident or that their clothes are soiled.
  • Unable to bend and reach behind them to properly wipe

2. Toileting and Sensory Processing Related to Sensory Defensiveness

  • Dislikes the feeling of “peeing” or “pooping” and withholds.
  • Fearful of falling into a regular sized toilet
  • Dislikes the feeling of wiping or being wiped.
  • Prefers the parent to wipe them
  • Does not like to wash their hands
  • Takes off all their clothes to use a toilet
  • Avoids flushing the toilet

3. Toileting and Sensory Processing Issues Related to Poor Registration of Sensory Input with a Hyperactive or Over-reactive Response

  • The child is fearful of the sensations involved when they pee or poop.
  • Reports that the act of “peeing” or “pooing” hurts terribly, crying, etc.
  • Extreme reaction to the sound of the flush or the air dryer
  • Gags, or chokes at the smell of the poop
  • Visually distracted by details in the bathroom, including lines in the tile, dust on the floor, etc.

4. Toileting and Sensory Processing Related to Sensory Seeking

  • Repetitively flushing the toilet
  • Fecal smearing
  • Repetitively having accidents in pants, enjoys the sensation
  • Playing in the water
  • Playing in the sink
  • Asks to use the toilet in public constantly

5. Toileting and Sensory Processing Issues related to Sensory Avoiding

  • Avoids wearing big girl or big boy underwear, prefers a diaper
  • Will tell you when the diaper needs to be changed, doesn’t want a wet diaper
  • Difficulty tolerating new bathrooms, public bathrooms, etc.
  • Covers ears when flushing, air hand dryer goes on, etc.
  • Holds nose for bowel movements
  • Avoids using certain toilets with “hard” seats
  • Avoids going into the bathroom, “sneaks off” to poop in diaper behind a couch, etc.

potty training, sensory processing

How to Help: 15 Amazing Strategies for Toileting

1. Try a  4 in 1 Stages Potty Seat which is closer to the ground and fits a smaller bottom. It also helps transition to use a grown-up toilet

2.  Try fun potty seats like this Race Car Potty and Character Underwear that are motivating!

3.  Try using flushable wipes and a Wipes Warmer to make the experience of wiping more enjoyable

* one consideration for this is that your child may begin to rely on it…. if you are out in public and don’t have warm wipes, will it be a problem?  Take that into consideration before making it part of your routine.  But if you are desperate, it’s worth a shot!

4.  Sing Songs to make toilet training more fun:

  • “Let it go! Let it go!”
  • “Push it out, Push it out, WAY OUT!”
  • “Pee Pee in the Potty, Pee Pee in the Potty!”
  • “I just want to Potty all the time, Potty all the time, Potty all the time!”

5.  Use painter’s tape to make a line for boys to know where to stand

6.  Offer Toilet Targets  or use goldfish crackers or fruit loops (get the pee in the hole!)

7.  For children who aren’t sure if they have to pee OR poop, let them sit.  It’s hard to tell which muscles are which.

8.  Provide an inviting environment depending on your child’s sensory needs:

  • For a sensory seeker, bright lights, fun music, and toys alerting aromatherapy (peppermint and eucalyptus).

  • For a  sensory avoider, soft lighting (night lights) and music, calming aromatherapy (lavender and chamomile).  *Click for more info about Aromatherapy

9.  Let your child leave the room before flushing if they are defensive, OR let your child choose if they flush or you do.

10.  Use earplugs to block the sounds, (especially in a public bathroom), OR keep post-its in your bag to put over the automatic sensor.

11.  Use a soft toilet seat.

12.  Keep a  Potty Training Chart   or offer Potty Reward Stickers for Boys or Girls

13.  Try a toileting schedule. Have your child sit on the toilet every 15 minutes for a few minutes. If they go, Wahoo! big Praise. If not, that’s ok, we’ll try again in 15 minutes.

14.  Provide a Kitchen Timer for set “potty” sitting times.  Let your child set the timer so they are a part of the process.

15.  If your child is fearful of the sensation of pooping in the toilet, have them help you dump the poop from the diaper into the toilet and then flush it.

Toileting and sensory issues

Toileting and Sensory Processing in Children with Special Needs

Very often problems with potty-training, such as accidents, difficulty recognizing if they have to go, struggles with hygiene, fear of flushing, and refusal to use the toilet are the result of an inefficient sensory processing system.  It is important to note that children with developmental delays and other diagnoses may need more time to be trained.   As parents and educators, it is essential to treat the process with patience.  Your child has a lot of information and sensory signals to make sense of and every child has to go at their own pace.  Do not feel the “peer pressure” from other parents that your child “should be” ready.

Sensory Processing Resources

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Additional Potty Training Resources

Establishing Toileting Routines for Children Tips – a Printable from the American Occupational Therapy Association

6 Tips for Successful Potty Training from the American Occupational Therapy Association

References

Abraham, M. C. (2002). In Pressnal D. O., Wheeler K. (Eds.), Addressing learning differences: Sensory integration; practical strategies and sensory motor activities for use in the classroom. Frank Schaffer Publications.

Ahn, R., Miller, L., Milberger, S., & McIntosh, D. (2004). Prevalence of parents’ perceptions of sensory processing disorders among kindergarten children.  American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, 287-293.

Crozier, S. C., Goodson, J. Z., Mackay, M. L., Synnes, A. R., Grunau, R. E., Miller, S. P., et al. (2015). Sensory processing patterns in children born very preterm. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70.

Daunhauer, L., Fidler, D., & Will, E. (March 2014). School function in students with down syndrome. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(2):167-176. 

Garland, T. (2014). Self-regulation interventions and strategies. Eau Claire, WI: PESI Publishing & Media. Shelly J. Lane, PhD, OTR/L, FOATA, Isabelle Beaudry-Bellefeuille, MScOT; Examining the Sensory Characteristics of Preschool Children With Retentive Fecal Incontinence. Am J Occup Ther 2015;69(Suppl. 1):6911500194p1. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO6099.

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Do you have an amazing toileting trick or tip? What potty training strategy helped your child?

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Sensory Theraplay Box

Do you know a child who just LOVES Sensory toys?  I mean gooey, flashy, squishy, squeezable and spinnable toys that stimulate their senses of sight, taste, touch, smell, and hearing.

As a pediatric Occupational Therapist, I have to admit that I have a LOT of students who love sensory stimulation.  And I have a bunch of sensory toys that I use routinely in my therapy sessions.

But it’s very easy to get stuck in a rut. 

My kids get bored with the same toys over and over.  But I don’t have time to go scouring for new sensory toys all the time.  And the families that I work with aren’t sure what to get or where to get the perfect sensory toys for their children.

But there’s a solution!

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I recently discovered Sensory Theraplay Box, a subscription sensory play box that’s delivered to your doorstep!  This is such a cool idea – a box full of new sensory toys specially hand picked by a pediatric Occupational Therapist delivered to your house during the first week of the month.

Each box is different! It’s filled with toys to help develop important sensory-motor skills & stimulate the senses.  These are perfect for getting your child to engage in sensory play!

Here are the details:

  • A variety of toys to engage your child in fun, silly sensory play!
  • Boxes ship out the first week of each month
  • Items are therapeutic & can be calming or help manage anxiety
  • Curated for children with autism/ sensory needs in mind, but suitable for children of all abilities
  • Each month’s box is carefully assembled by a licensed occupational therapist and includes a description card inside

You know when you are looking for the perfect gift and you just don’t know what to get?

It’s the worst.

This is the perfect gift for a child with Sensory Processing difficulties.  Or a child who thrives on engaging sensory play.  Actually, it’s the perfect gift for any child!

The Sensory Theraplay is a wonderful gift idea for birthdays, holidays, or other special occasions.   It’s an amazing way to get a child actively playing with sensory toys, using their imagination,  and learning how to self-regulate.

THE PERFECT GIFT FOR A CHILD WITH Sensory Needs, AUTISM OR ADHD

The Sensory Theraplay Box is filled with engaging, appropriate toys that encouraged children to functionally play and use their hands.   The boxes are designed for children who have sensory needs, but they are fun for any child!

I have to say, I am impressed with the quality and range of toys that were included in my box.   I brought them to school and my kids were psyched!

“Where did you get this?”

“Can I keep this?”   

The variety of toys included in my box appealed to all of my students.  Those who needed alerting activities were excited with the stimulating toys, and those who played with the calming activities showed improved self-regulation.

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Combining Handwriting and Play

This post “Combining Handwriting and Play”  is part of a year-long blog hop called Functional Skills for Kids.  Each month, I will be working with other pediatric OTs and PTs to post on different developmental topics that impact functional skills for kids. I’m so honored to be working with some amazing pediatric bloggers to bring you a well-rounded blog hop that will ultimately result in a BOOK!

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Weighted fidget

How to Make a Weighted Fidget

How to Make a Do-It-Yourself Weighted Fidget

I’ve been blogging a lot lately about fidgets and fidgety kids.  Parents and teachers are always looking for a way to keep fidgety kids quiet and focused.  Weighted items like vests or lap pads are commonly used by teachers to help kids who are fidgety, restless, and unfocused.  Fidgets are another common request – they are great for keeping busy fingers quiet while the rest of a child’s body is attending to the lesson at hand.

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A Fidget for Busy Hands

 

Busy Hands for a Fidgety Kid

Fidgets, Fidgets, Fidgets!

If you’ve been reading my latest posts, you’ll notice that I’ve been talking a lot about fidgets, fidgeting, and all things fidgety. Teachers are constantly asking how to help their students focus and how to keep them in their seats. Parents are looking for sensory toys to help their child succeed at school.  There are many simple fidgets that you can supply a student with to keep busy hands quiet during class activities.

As I’ve recently posted, there are great little toys you can get at the dollar store that will do the job. But, sometimes you need something more. Something sturdy, durable, washable, AND fidgety. Today I’m excited to write about a new product I found called Fiddle Focus™ for Busy Fingers.  It’s made by Creative Educational Strategies and Services.  I had a great experience with one of my most fidgety Kindergarten kids ever. This product did the trick, so I’m happy to share my good luck with you.

*This post contains affiliate links

The Busy Hands tactile fidget is a tactile strip with four different patterns and materials set next to each other in a horizontal row.  There is velcro attached to the back, so you can stick it to the underneath of a desk or a table if that is convenient.

My Fidgety Kindergarten Case

“Danny” was a 5-year-old boy who presented with all the classic symptoms of ADHD.  He was inattentive, impulsive, and had a constant need to be moving.  I worked very closely with the special education teacher in his co-teaching kindergarten classroom to make sure that Danny’s environment was set up so that he could learn.  We tried a Seat Cushion for him, which helped him stay seated for longer periods of time. Then we added TheraBand to the legs of his chair, so he could kick while sitting at his Kindergarten work table.  We gave him a weighted vest to wear during circle time, which he loved.  So we had most of our bases covered.

Except for his hands.

 Those fingers would seek out anything they could during lessons, resulting in untied shoelaces, tiny crayon wrappers all over the desk, you name it.  I decided to try out the Busy Fingers from Fiddle focus.  We had already tried Velcro under the table as a tactile fidget.  The problem was that he kept peeling it off.  Simply rubbing the Velcro wasn’t enough.

busy fingers

The Busy Fingers tactile strip turned out to be perfect.  It comes with a velcro strip, so we stuck it to the underneath of his kindergarten table right at his seat.  Now it was out of view, which didn’t make all the other kids ask about it.

But, when he got up to go sit on the rug, he was able to peel it off and take it with him.  This way, his fingers were busy while the teacher taught her lesson of the day.  Now, with the vest, the cushion, and the Busy Fingers, we had the tools we needed to help Danny focus.  On a side note, Danny’s mom was on board with us trying all this stuff.  He was just as inattentive and fidgety at home.

busy fingers fidget

Danny’s special ed teacher told me that Danny was doing great with the Busy Fingers.  She said  “he’s playing with it while the teacher is teaching but he hears everything she says.   It’s under the table so the other kids aren’t distracted, but he loves to reach for it in between lessons”. Sometimes it’s hard to understand that a child can still hear everything you say even if they aren’t looking at you.  But the same is true for us.  How often do we watch TV, read a book and have a conversation with someone at the same time? Not everyone’s brains are wired to concentrate on one thing at a time. That’s okay. As long as you get done what needs to get done, it’s all good.

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How to Throw a Kids Halloween Party…Sensory Style!

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Autumn:  pumpkin pie, costumes, and everything else.

As an OT, I love to get into the “Halloween Spirit” of things at school with my students.  Sensory recipes are always a great way to work on multiple skills at once, including Mixing, Measuring, Pouring, Stirring, and Kneading.

Cooking is a great way to work on fine motor skills, bilateral coordination (using two hands), dexterity, and functional life skills.

 Sensory recipes are a non-edible method of working on all the above skills, which is perfect for school.

Food Allergies at Halloween

It’s important to make sure that none of your students have food allergies or aversions when you bring a Sensory recipe into a classroom. Some of my kids have gluten-free diets or nut allergies, so when in doubt, I send a letter home with the ingredients a week before the activity to get permission from the parent.  Better to be on the safe side.

Halloween parties often include lots of candy and junk food. Instead of the typical sugar overload, why not set up a bunch of fun Sensory activities to get your kid’s friends in the Halloween Spirit?

Halloween Sensory Recipes

Here are my five favorite Sensory recipes – with a Halloween spin!

1) Halloween Dirt Doh

I’ve written about this recipe before, it’s a simple recipe with used coffee grinds.  Make a large batch and it’s perfect for a Spooky Coffin!

Here’s the recipe:

2 cups used coffee grinds (wet or dry)

2 cups of water (add it little by little until you get the consistency you want)

2 cups of flour (add more if you need to make the doh a little more doughy)

I asked my local bagel store to save me all their used coffee grinds for a few days before our Halloween party.  When I went to pick it up, they had three bags full.  Perfect!  I filled an “under the bed storage” tupperware container with my ingredients.

I let my students mix it up with spoons and their hands.  Then we hid some “spooky” items in the dirt – eyeballs, fingers, and bones.  Add a fake tombstone and voila!

Now you have an awesome spooky sensory activity that addresses tactile defensiveness, hand strength, and bilateral coordination.   Also – used coffee grinds have a distinct odor.  Kids who are picky eaters usually have a strong sense of smell, which can trigger a gag reflex.  Engaging in “smelly” activities is a good way to work on desensitizing the sense of smell.   Finding things that are hidden in a busy background is a visual perceptual skill called visual figure-ground.

Add a blindfold that takes away the visual component, and now you are working on stereognosis.  Stereognosis is the ability to recognize an object by using tactile information.  This means a person uses their tactile sense without using their vision or sense of vision or hearing to figure out what they are touching.  Just like digging in your purse for your phone, while looking at something else.

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Sensory Processing 101 is a vital resource for parents, therapists, and teachers who work with children with Sensory Processing Difficulties.

Bet you do that a lot! I know I do…

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dirt doh, coffee grind doh

2)  Halloween Slime

A simple slime recipe can be altered a million different ways.  Add a bit of food coloring or washable paint and you can color it to fit any holiday or theme.  I used my go-to slime recipe, added a bit of orange food coloring, and gave my kiddies some cheap Halloween manipulatives to play with.

Here’s the recipe:

2 cups of Elmer’s glue

2 cups of water

2 cups of liquid starch (found in the laundry aisle)

Mix the glue and the water together to thin out the glue.  Then, slowly add the liquid starch. Mix together with a spoon, then knead with hands.  Add coloring to your liking.  Once the starch is all blended (I let the kids take turns kneading and squeezing the whole batch), split the batch into individual portions for each child.  Then the fun begins!  The texture of the slime can vary, which can alter your activity. I had one class that ended up with very “stringy” slime, which reminded us of spider webs!  Another class had very firm slime, which was perfect to make Jack o’ lanterns.  Add some cookie cutters, manipulatives, etc. and let the kids get creative!  You can even leave it white and let the kids create their own mummies or ghost faces!

 

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slime, Halloween, pumpkin

 

3) Halloween Play-doh

– you can go simple and just buy playdoh, or you can whip some up the old fashioned way.

You can use cookie cutters to make witches, pumpkins, spiders, you name it!  I like to use a chip tray to give my kids cut up pipe cleaners, wobbly eyes, and tiny spiders.  The kids can make a Halloween creation of their own design.

spidertray, sensory activities, HalloweenHalloween playdoh, spider

 

4) Pumpkin Pie Playdoh

I am a pumpkin lover. I love the taste, but I also really love the smell! Like I said, it’s good to incorporate olfactory (smelly) stuff into your activities. It can help picky eaters to broaden their boundaries and it is a great way to incorporate multi-sensory learning into your lessons.

You can use a simple play-doh recipe and add some Pumpkin Pie Spice and some orange food coloring and you have the perfect Pumpkin Pie Playdoh!

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Here’s what you need to make the doh:

2 cups of flour (you can use gluten-free if you need to)

1/2 cup of salt

1 cup of water

a dash of pumpkin pie spice (a make your own recipe listed below if you can’t find it)

a couple of drops of orange food coloring or washable paint

Mix the flour and the salt together. Add the water bit by bit and keep mixing and kneading until you get a firm, doughy texture.  Add the pumpkin pie spice and the orange paint. I like to do this at the end because the kids can see where the paint isn’t mixed.  This gives them a visual cue to keep kneading, twisting and squeezing until the colors are blended nicely.

To make pumpkin pie spice:

1/4 cup of ground cinnamon

4 tsp. ground nutmeg

4 tsp. ground ginger

1 tbs. ground allspice

This results in quite a bit of pumpkin pie spice – you can half it if you want, but I love to keep it around and use it to flavor my coffee. Add a teaspoon to your regular coffee grinds and you’ve got some fabulous pumpkin flavored coffee.  Who needs Starbucks!? Budget Divas make their own!

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5)  Ghost Guts

My kids got a giggle out of this one!  I took a simple sensory recipe and gave it a Halloween name.  It went great!

Here’s what you need:

2 parts corn starch

2 parts shaving cream

You can give each kid a bowl or make it in one big batch.  I made it in a big Tupperware bowl and let my kids do the mixing.  I also hid some little white bones and spiders in there for my kids to pull out. They loved it.

ghost guts

 

I hope your Halloween party is a smashing sensory success!

Do you have any great Halloween Sensory Recipes to share with us?

Miss Jaime OT

Happy Halloween! ~Miss Jaime, O.T.

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Y is for Yucky…

Alphabet Sensory Activities Facebook

Welcome to Alphabet Sensory Activities, hosted by The Jenny Evolution along with their partner site The Sensory Spectrum! 26 amazing bloggers have gotten together to share a sensory experience based on a letter of the alphabet every day this month. dirtdohThis post contains affiliate links.

Dirt Doh…totally yucky!  

As a contributor to the Alphabet Sensory Activities Series, I am responsible for the letter Y.  For me, the first thing I think of is  “YUCKY!”   I love to do sensory activities, especially recipes, with my class push-ins.  There are so many functional skills to work on; no matter the age of level of your students.  Stirring, Pouring, Kneading,  and Squeezing are just a few ways to work on hand strength and bilateral coordination.   Measuring, Sequencing, Calculating, and Adding are just a few ways to add Math to the Mix.

Depending on the class I am with, I like to have the children practice opening the packages, walking across the room with water from the sink, and find the measuring cups they need.  For older children, I add a math component by asking them to “double” the recipe or “half” the recipe.  If the recipe is edible, I even include daily living skills such as washing hands, setting the table, or cutting with a knife and fork.  Literally, one recipe can yield endless activities. This is one recipe that I have used in a few different ways and I am so excited to share my recipe for …

“Dirt Doh”

Dirt is Yucky! Therefore kids love it!  This is a great recipe that is also a “green” activity.  Used coffee grinds are the main ingredient, and you can switch up the recipe to change the consistency.

Here’s what you need:

1 parts used coffee grinds (wet or dry)

1 part water

1 part flour

Mix all the ingredients.  Add more flour if it’s too wet.

I’ve used this recipe in October to make a Halloween “coffin” filled with “dirt”, bones, fingers, and eyeballs. I’ve also used it in the spring as science lessons to talk about how flowers grow and how bugs live.  And worse comes to worse, just make “mud pies” because it’s fun!  Dirt Doh is so versatile!

Dirt doh, coffee grinds, sensory play

Using “dirt doh” as a spring sensory activity while learning about how flowers grow and how bugs live.

Coffee coffin, Halloween sensory

Using “Dirt Doh” to fill an under the bed storage container to make a “coffin” in October to dig for eyeballs, bones, and other Yucky stuff.

Strength, dirt doh, coffee doh

Using “dirt doh” to work on hand strength and bilateral coordination just because its fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dirt is “yucky” and kids love “Yucky!!!

If you like Dirt Doh, please make sure to check out the rest of the Alphabet Sensory Activity Series on the Jenny Evolution.com.

sensory processing

Sensory Processing 101 is a vital resource for parents, teachers, and therapists who work with children with Sensory Processing difficulties.


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Products you may be interested in:

*These are affiliate links

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Glow in The Dark Slime (Pack of 12)

 

 

 

 

 


Be Amazing Insta-Snow Jar, Makes 2 Gallons

 

 

 

Miss Jaime OT

Have any other “yucky” recipes for us? Please share!                   ~Miss Jaime, OT

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