Vision 101 Scholarship Application – August 2020

We’re offering scholarships for our course!

If you’ve been following me, you know that I LOVE to help grownups HELP THEIR KIDS. Whether it’s our students, our own children, or our grandchildren,  our kiddos need us.

So many children are walking around with undiagnosed vision issues, and we understand that this pandemic has caused financial hardship for so many wonderful hardworking therapists out there.

As healthcare and educational professionals, My co-host Robert and I want to give back to our community of followers who may be facing financial hardship.

So we’re offering TEN people a FULL SCHOLARSHIP to Vision 101 for School-based Occupational Therapy Practitioners.

This is a needs-based scholarship for School Occupational Therapists and OT Assistants.

We’ll notify the winners via email and post them on this page.

Scholarship Rules:

  1. Ten people will be chosen by August 18th.
  2. We will notify the winners by email and update this page with the winners.
  3. Winners can take the course and obtain AOTA credit FREE.
  4. Winners will be chosen based on their scholarship answers.
  5. Winners who paid for the course will be refunded.

AUGUST 2020 WINNERS ANNOUNCED!

Kathy Castrataro

Jenna DiLissio

Dimitris Voutsinos

Joyce Kalsch

Hetal Lakhani

Erin Stiles

Michelle Davis

Brittany Lynn Cegielski

Kayla Banks

Tamar Solomom

 

Learn more about the course here. 

Learn More about Vision:

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The Eye Exam Kids REALLY Need

The EYE EXAM KIDS REALLY NEED

Did you know that the eye exam that the school gives just looks to see if the child may need glasses?  There are actually WAY more problems that a child can have that would interfere with their progress in school.

There are different kinds of eye care professionals and different models of treatment. Some doctors may only check the health of the eye and if the child needs glasses. Others also check eye movement and if the eyes work together.

Unfortunately, many children are walking around with undiagnosed vision deficits. The parents get them glasses so they think they’ve crossed vision problems off the list.

Nope!

The most common vision problem (besides needing glasses) that school Occupational Therapy practitioners encounter is binocular vision deficits.

But there are a huge number of vision problems that may be impacting a child’s schoolwork. It’s really important that children have a complete eye exam. Not just finding out if they need glasses.

Visual Efficiency NEEDS TO BE ASSESSED

Binocular Vision Disorders  – when a child’s two eyes aren’t working together as a team.  This may include strabismus, convergence and divergence.  Binocular vision issues are more common in children with with learning disabilities, developmental delays.

Ocular Motor (Eye Movement) Disorders – Eye movements include pursuits, saccades, and fixation.

  • Pursuits – The reflex to follow a moving visual stimulus
  • Saccades – A single eye movement from one thing to another, such as words in a sentence.
  • Fixation – The ability to keep the eyes focused on a stationary object.

Accommodative Disorders are also called Focusing Disorders. Children who struggle with looking from near to far and back again are among 5 to 6 percent of the general pediatric population (Scheiman, 2104).

Think of how many children have trouble copying from the board.  That could be due to Accommodation.

Many children struggle with reading. Despite tutoring, they don’t make progress.  That could be a problem with the near vision system.

A child who tends to avoid sports and doesn’t want to play catch may struggle with convergence, and can’t see the ball as it’s coming toward them or they may see double.  

THE TRADITIONAL EYE EXAM DOESN’T ASSESS THESE AREAS.

WHAT IS A COMPLETE EYE EXAM?

A COMPLETE eye exam follows  the Three Component Model of Vision:

  • Checks the health of the eye and if the child needs glasses
  • Visual Information processing skills (aka visual perception)
  • Checks the child’s visual efficiency
            • Accommodation
            • Binocular Vision
            • Eye Movements

An annual eye exam done by an Optometrist may not include all three of these components.  It depends on the doctor’s training.  It can be difficult to find an optometrist who will do an exam that looks for more than just glasses.  But for some children, it makes all the difference in the world.

It’s time to UNCOVER those hidden vision problems!


ARE YOU A SCHOOL OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST? 

School Occupational Therapy practitioners can screen and remediate many different vision deficits.  It’s important to receive training so you feel competent.

Sign up for Vision 101 for School Occupational Therapy Practitioners, an AOTA approved on-line training for school occupational therapy assistants and therapists.

Click the image!

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Uncovering Hidden Vision Deficits in the Classroom

There’s more to vision than just needing glasses

“But he already has glasses!”  Even though we were separated by the phone, I could tell the mom thought I was crazy.   Her son wears glasses every day, and here I just recommended that she take him for a vision exam.

“But there’s more to vision than just needing glasses” I explained.  “He needs a COMPLETE vision exam, so we can see what’s going on”.

Now the mom’s voice was exasperated.  “What are you saying? The doctor did an incomplete exam?” 

There are different kinds of eye care professionals and different models of treatment. Some doctors may only check the health of the eye and if the child needs glasses. Others also check eye movement and if the eyes work together.

Max was in the third grade.  He was diagnosed with ADHD but his meds just weren’t working.

“He ‘s in reading extra help and math extra help – but they’re not helping!?” 

Mom’s mood changed from angry to confused to sad.

“He’s starting to hate school. I don’t know what to do!” 

Unfortunately, this is pretty common for children with undiagnosed vision deficits. The parents get them glasses so they think they’ve crossed vision problems off the list.

But it’s just not true.

The most common vision problem (besides needing glasses) that school Occupational Therapy practitioners encounter is binocular vision deficits.

But there are a huge number of vision problems that may be impacting a child’s schoolwork. It’s really important that children have a complete eye exam. Not just finding out if they need glasses.

Understanding Visual Efficiency with Children

Binocular Vision Disorders  – when a child’s two eyes aren’t working together as a team.  This may include strabismus, convergence and divergence.  Binocular vision issues are more common in children with with learning disabilities, developmental delays.

Ocular Motor (Eye Movement) Disorders – Eye movements include pursuits, saccades, and fixation.

  • Pursuits – The reflex to follow a moving visual stimulus
  • Saccades – A single eye movement from one thing to another, such as words in a sentence.
  • Fixation – The ability to keep the eyes focused on a stationary object.

Accommodative Disorders are also called Focusing Disorders. Children who struggle with looking from near to far and back again are among 5 to 6 percent of the general pediatric population (Scheiman, 2104).

SOmetimes it’s Not ADHD, It’s Vision.

Very often, children with vision difficulties display behaviors such as

  • avoiding work
  • taking much longer to complete reading and writing assignments
  • complaining of headaches
  • difficulty focusing and paying attention

These are also common symptoms of Attention Deficit Disorder.  So it’s sometimes hard to tell what exactly is going on with that student.

WHAT IS A COMPLETE EYE EXAM?

There are two models of vision:

The One Component Model of Vision:

  • Checks the health of the eye and if the child needs glasses

The second, called the Three Component Model of Vision:

  • Checks the health of the eye and if the child needs glasses
  • Visual Information processing skills (aka visual perception)
  • Checks the child’s visual efficiency
            • Accommodation
            • Binocular Vision
            • Eye Movements

An annual eye exam done by an Optometrist may not include all three of these components.  It depends on the doctor’s training.  It can be difficult to find an optometrist who will do an exam that looks for more than just glasses.  But for some children, it makes all the difference in the world.

After all, it’s awfully hard to learn if you can’t see what you’re looking at. 

Max’s mom listened to me explain the different types of eye problems that a complete eye exam would rule out.  “I had no idea that my Dr. may not have looked at that!”

She laughed ruefully. “Half of me is mad…. and the other half is hopeful”

I knew what she meant. Of course, she didn’t WANT Max to have a vision deficit besides needing glasses.  But on the other hand – what if there’s been a hidden problem all along?

It’s time to UNCOVER those hidden vision problems!


ARE YOU A SCHOOL OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST? 

School Occupational Therapy practitioners can screen and remediate many different vision deficits.  It’s important to recieve training so you feel competent.

Sign up for Vision 101 for School Occupational Therapy Practitioners, an AOTA approved on-line training for school occupational therapy assistants and therapists.

vision, children, glasses, kids glasses, kids vision, eye exams, ADHD, vision issues, vision problems, convergence

Is your child’s learning disability actually a vision issue?

 An undiagnosed vision issue could easily be mistaken for a learning disability. Does your child have an undiagnosed vision problem?

I’m thrilled to have pediatric OT and vision rehab specialist  Robert Constantine guest post for me today.  Did you know that school vision screenings only detect 20-30% of vision problems?

Is it an undiagnosed Vision issue?

Vision is our furthest reaching sense. It tells us 75% of what we know about the world around us.

It affects movement, balance, and reading and writing ability.

But vision is a frequently overlooked contributor to academic problems. Undiagnosed eye movement problems can mimic conditions like ADHD and dyslexia and are not identified on school screenings, making a complete vision exam a must for every child.

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